Sea Glass: Blue Tinies

Sea Glass: Blue Tinies

Blue Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Many of the tiny blue sea glass shards I find had made their home on the shores of Glass Beach in Fort Bragg, California. Most are cobalt blue. Other shades of blue I've found include cornflower, aqua, soft blue, teal and once in a great while when I'm lucky I'll find a tiny turquoise shard.   Cobalt Blue Sea Glass The manufacturing of cobalt blue glass dates back all the way to the creation of ancient Egyptian pottery. The popularity of cobalt blue for household glassware still continues today. If you find a shard of cobalt blue sea glass, it's possible it came from a medicine bottle, Noxzema jar, Vicks Vapor Rug jar, or Bromo-Seltzer bottle from the early 1900s before the manufacturers switched from glass to plastic for their containers.   Cornflower, Aqua, and Soft Blue Sea Glass Cornflower,…
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Vaseline, UV, Ultraviolet, and Uranium Sea Glass: What is it?

Vaseline, UV, Ultraviolet, and Uranium Sea Glass: What is it?

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog, UV Sea Glass, Vaseline Sea Glass
It's referred to by different names: Vaseline, UV, ultraviolet, and uranium sea glass, but what is it? Because it was produced with the element uranium, Vaseline or UV sea glass is glass that's easily recognized as it glows under a black or ultraviolet light. The more uranium the sea glass contains, the brighter it will glow under a black light. However, Vaseline or UV sea glass contains only up to 2% uranium, which is such a small amount that experts say it's not considered harmful to humans.   What Was Vaseline and UV Glass Used For Vaseline and UV glass was mainly used for everyday household glassware. The main production periods for Vaseline and UV glass were during the late 1800s and up until the World War II when the use of uranium for…
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Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
If you've found orange sea glass, you're quite lucky. The odds of finding orange are about 1 in 10,000, says Richard Lamotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature's Vanishing Gems. Why is Orange Sea Glass So Rare? The main reason orange sea glass is so rare is the color was not manufactured as much as other colored glass. In addition, back in the early 1900s, there was little evidence left behind that documented how orange glass was made, but it's likely little orange glass was produced because the chances of creating the same exact orange hue with chemicals in different batches of glass was challenging. Where Does Orange Sea Glass Come From? Glass manufacturers such as Jeanette, Federal, Fire-King, and Imperial made translucent orange tableware in the early 1900s.…
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Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Because the color of sea glass is determined mostly by its source, on average, most sea glass shards people find lying on the shore come in the three most popular glass colors: green, clear white, and brown. Others colors, however, like orange, red, yellow, purple, and turquoise and even black are rare. Most sea glass come from bottles. A smaller percentage depending on color come from tableware, specialty glass, vases, stained glass, windows, car lights, marbles, insulators, and other forms of glass. Depending on where you collect sea glass, some colors might be rarer than others. For example, if you look for sea glass along the coasts of the United States, you'll likely find fewer rare cobalt blue, sea foam, orange or red shards than if you lived in another…
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Sea Glass Marbles

Sea Glass Marbles

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Marbles
Children--and some adults too--have enjoyed playing with marbles for thousands of years. According to Richard LaMotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature"s Vanishing Gems, marbles have been found with the remains of Egyptian children. In the United States, clay marbles were mass produced in the 1880s: however, the popularity of marbles decreased in the latter half of the 20th century. Today antique marble collecting is popular. There is even an organization named Marble Collectors Society of America.  The site has a lot of pictures and information about the history of marbles. Find Sea Glass Marbles Sea glass marbles are rare. I haven't found one yet, but I did see a woman find a pretty blue one on Glass Beach in Fort Bragg, California. She let me look at it…
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Elegant and Rare Pink Sea Glass

Elegant and Rare Pink Sea Glass

Find Sea Glass, Pink Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Most rare pink sea glass comes from transparent pattern-molded Depression glass tableware produced during the 1920s to the 1950s. The majority of its production was during the 1930s when the demand for affordable glassware rose during the Depression. Patterns and Colors Depression glass was produced in many assorted patterns and colors. Besides pink, most Depression glassware also came in other transparent colors such as yellow, green, light blue, and clear and translucent pastel blue and green. If you're interested in looking at the many different patterns of Depression glass, check out depression-glass.net. Finding Pink Sea Glass The odds of finding pink sea glass are rare: approximately 1 in 1,000, says Richard LaMotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Nature's Vanishing Gems. So far, I've only found two frosty pink shards in…
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Rare and Beautiful Turquoise Sea Glass

Rare and Beautiful Turquoise Sea Glass

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog, Turquoise Sea Glass
Among the shades of blue sea glass, turquoise stands out as the most rare and beautiful. The odds that you'll find a turquoise shard are approximately 1 in 5,000, says Richard LaMotte author of the popular book Pure Sea Glass: Nature's Vanishing Gems. It's even likely you'll find more rare red sea glass than turquoise.   What is Turquoise Sea Glass Made From The color was produced mostly for pressed glass rather than blown bottles. Manufacturers used turquoise glass to produce things such as tableware, vases, seltzer bottles, flasks, and art glass.   Rare and Beautiful Peak production years of turquoise glass ranged from the late 1800s to the 1950s. Because turquoise glass was hardly ever used in the mass production of glass, you can assume that any piece you…
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Sea Glass Colors: What Are the Odds of Finding Them?

Sea Glass Colors: What Are the Odds of Finding Them?

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Basics, Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Colors
Common Sea Glass Colors The main thing that affects sea glass rarity is whether or not its color has been mass produced over the past several decades. For example, beachcombers usually find a lot of white, brown, and Kelly green sea glass because these colors of glass have been mass produced since the last century by bottling companies that sell a lot of soda and beer. Rare Sea Glass Colors Colors of sea glass that fall into the rare and extremely rare categories like red, orange, yellow, pink, and turquoise come from sources such as household glassware, Depression glassware, art glass, car lights, ink bottles, fruit jars, lamps, perfume bottles, and flasks. These items are not as ubiquitous as soda and beer bottles. Also, the process, chemicals, and elements to produce rare colors of glass…
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