Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Because the color of sea glass is determined mostly by its source, on average, most sea glass shards people find lying on the shore come in the three most popular glass colors: green, clear white, and brown. Others colors, however, like orange, red, yellow, purple, and turquoise and even black are rare.

Most sea glass come from bottles. A smaller percentage depending on color come from tableware, specialty glass, vases, stained glass, windows, car lights, marbles, insulators, and other forms of glass.

Depending on where you collect sea glass, some colors might be rarer than others. For example, if you look for sea glass along the coasts of the United States, you’ll likely find fewer rare cobalt blue, sea foam, orange or red shards than if you lived in another country like England

Many sea glass collectors identify colors, rarity, and average ratios of sea glass according to Richard LaMotte’s Pure Sea Glass Identification Cards and his book Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature’s Vanishing Gems. 

LaMotte categorizes colors into four groups: common, uncommon, rare, and extremely rare.

Listed below are the colors of sea glass and their average finding ratios according to LaMotte

Common Colors

 

Kelly Green Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 5

Sources: Mostly drinking bottles and some tableware

Kelly Green Sea Glass

 

Clear White Sea Glass (Usually clear when wet and frosty white when dry) – Finding ratio: 2 in 3

Sources: Mostly bottles, some tableware, and other clear glass containers

Clear White Sea Glass

 

Brown Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 2

Sources: Mostly bottles

Brown Sea Glass

Uncommon Colors

 

Soft Green or “Sea Foam” Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 50+

Sources: Mostly bottles

Soft Green Sea Glass

 

Soft Blue Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 50+

Sources: Mostly bottles, some windows and tableware

Soft Blue Sea Glass

 

Forest Green Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 50

Sources: Mostly bottles and a small number come from art glass

Forest Green Sea Glass

 

Lime Green Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 50

Sources: Mostly bottles and a small amount from tableware

Lime Green Sea Glass

 

Golden Amber Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 25+

Sources: Mostly bottles

Golden Amber Sea Glass

 

Amber Sea Glass – Finding Ration 1 in 25+

Sources: Mostly bottles

Amber Sea Glass

 

Jade Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 25

Sources: Bottles and tableware

Jade Sea Glass

Rare Sea Glass Colors

 

Pink – Finding Ratio: 1 in 1,000

Sources: Mostly tableware, some bottles and a small amount of art glass

Pink Sea Glass

 

Aqua – Finding Ratio: 1 in 500 (It can be difficult to tell the difference between aqua and soft blue sea glass.)

Sources: Mostly bottles

 

Aqua Sea Glass

 

Cornflower Blue Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 500

Sources: Mostly bottles and some tableware

Cornflower Blue Sea Glass

 

Cobalt Blue Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 250

Sources: Mostly bottles and some vases and tableware

Cobalt Blue Sea Glass

 

White Opaque Sea Glass (Also referred to as milk glass) – Finding Ratio: 1 in 250

Sources: Mostly tableware and some jars, vases, lids, and art glass

White Opaque Sea Glass

 

Citron – Finding Ratio: 1 in 250

Sources: Mostly bottles and a small number come from decorative tableware

Citron Sea Glass

 

Purple Sea Glass (Also referred to as amethyst) – Finding Ratio: 1 in 250

Sources: Mostly bottles and some tableware

Purple Sea Glass

Extremely Rare Sea Glass Colors

 

Orange Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 10,000

Orange sea glass is considered the rarest sea glass; however, some avid collectors claim red is the rarest. Orange glass was rarely used in the mass production of glass. It was produced for a short amount of time during the art-deco period. Some orange sea glass comes from tableware and the edges of warning lights.

Orange Sea Glass

 

Red Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 5,000

Sources: warning lights from cares, tableware, bottles, stained glass, and art glass

Red Sea Glass

 

Turquoise Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 5,000

Sources: Specialty tableware, decorative bottles, vases, and art glass

Turquoise Sea Glass

 

Yellow Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 3,500

Sources: Mostly tableware and some art glass and stained glass

Yellow Sea Glass

 

Black Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 2,000

Sources: Mostly bottles and some tableware and art glass

Black Sea Glass

 

Teal Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 2,000

Sources: Mostly bottles and some specialty glass

Teal Sea Glass

 

Gray Sea Glass – Finding Ratio: 1 in 2,000

Gray Sea Glass

 

 

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