Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Because the color of sea glass is determined mostly by its source, on average, most sea glass shards people find lying on the shore come in the three most popular glass colors: green, clear white, and brown. Others colors, however, like orange, red, yellow, purple, and turquoise and even black are rare. Most sea glass come from bottles. A smaller percentage depending on color come from tableware, specialty glass, vases, stained glass, windows, car lights, marbles, insulators, and other forms of glass. Depending on where you collect sea glass, some colors might be rarer than others. For example, if you look for sea glass along the coasts of the United States, you'll likely find fewer rare cobalt blue, sea foam, orange or red shards than if you lived in another…
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How to Identify Black Sea Glass

How to Identify Black Sea Glass

Black sea glass, Find Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Many experienced sea glass collectors will say black is one of the most difficult pieces to find. Besides the odds being about 1 in 2,000 that you'll find one, black sea glass is also more elusive because of the challenge to recognize it lying on the shore among dark rocks. Black Sea Glass Collecting Most sea glass collectors covet black shards because of their scarcity, and because black glass has been produced in limited amounts in contemporary times, much of the black sea glass lying on the beach is decades to hundreds of years old.   The Beauty of Black Most black sea glass is not black. Rather its true color is a dark, olive green or dark amber. When it's dry, it looks black. The beauty of black sea glass…
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Sea Glass Colors: What Are the Odds of Finding Them?

Sea Glass Colors: What Are the Odds of Finding Them?

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Basics, Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Colors
Common Sea Glass Colors The main thing that affects sea glass rarity is whether or not its color has been mass produced over the past several decades. For example, beachcombers usually find a lot of white, brown, and Kelly green sea glass because these colors of glass have been mass produced since the last century by bottling companies that sell a lot of soda and beer. Rare Sea Glass Colors Colors of sea glass that fall into the rare and extremely rare categories like red, orange, yellow, pink, and turquoise come from sources such as household glassware, Depression glassware, art glass, car lights, ink bottles, fruit jars, lamps, perfume bottles, and flasks. These items are not as ubiquitous as soda and beer bottles. Also, the process, chemicals, and elements to produce rare colors of glass…
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The Many Shades of Green Sea Glass

The Many Shades of Green Sea Glass

Find Sea Glass, Green sea glass, Sea Glass Blog
If you stroll along the beach looking for sea glass, the odds are good that many of the ones you'll find will be Kelly green. It's estimated that approximately one in five to three out of ten pieces of sea glass anyone finds along the shore are Kelly green.   WHY IS THERE SO MUCH KELLY GREEN SEA GLASS? A lot of sea glass comes in Kelly green because much of the mass produced glass that has been dumped into the ocean has been Kelly green. Automated mass production of glass bottles began in the Untied States in the early 1900s. So for many years, beers like Heineken, Becks and Rolling Rock have come in bottles in the popular Kelly green color as well as soda bottles like Mountain Dew, 7Up, Schwepps and Sprite.…
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