Vaseline, UV, Ultraviolet, and Uranium Sea Glass: What is it?

Vaseline, UV, Ultraviolet, and Uranium Sea Glass: What is it?

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog, UV Sea Glass, Vaseline Sea Glass
It's referred to by different names: Vaseline, UV, ultraviolet, and uranium sea glass, but what is it? Because it was produced with the element uranium, Vaseline or UV sea glass is glass that's easily recognized as it glows under a black or ultraviolet light. The more uranium the sea glass contains, the brighter it will glow under a black light. However, Vaseline or UV sea glass contains only up to 2% uranium, which is such a small amount that experts say it's not considered harmful to humans.   What Was Vaseline and UV Glass Used For Vaseline and UV glass was mainly used for everyday household glassware. The main production periods for Vaseline and UV glass were during the late 1800s and up until the World War II when the use of uranium for…
Read More
Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
If you've found orange sea glass, you're quite lucky. The odds of finding orange are about 1 in 10,000, says Richard Lamotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature's Vanishing Gems. Why is Orange Sea Glass So Rare? The main reason orange sea glass is so rare is the color was not manufactured as much as other colored glass. In addition, back in the early 1900s, there was little evidence left behind that documented how orange glass was made, but it's likely little orange glass was produced because the chances of creating the same exact orange hue with chemicals in different batches of glass was challenging. Where Does Orange Sea Glass Come From? Glass manufacturers such as Jeanette, Federal, Fire-King, and Imperial made translucent orange tableware in the early 1900s.…
Read More
Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Because the color of sea glass is determined mostly by its source, on average, most sea glass shards people find lying on the shore come in the three most popular glass colors: green, clear white, and brown. Others colors, however, like orange, red, yellow, purple, and turquoise and even black are rare. Most sea glass come from bottles. A smaller percentage depending on color come from tableware, specialty glass, vases, stained glass, windows, car lights, marbles, insulators, and other forms of glass. Depending on where you collect sea glass, some colors might be rarer than others. For example, if you look for sea glass along the coasts of the United States, you'll likely find fewer rare cobalt blue, sea foam, orange or red shards than if you lived in another…
Read More