How to Make a Solar Sea Glass Light

How to Make a Solar Sea Glass Light

Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Decorating Ideas, Sea Glass Lamps, Solar Sea Glass Mason Jar
After being inspired on Pinterest by all the things people are doing with Mason jars, I just had to make a sea glass Mason jar. One thing I've also been wanting to make is a sea glass nightlight, so while cruising through the Dollar Tree and looking at the solar lights, I had a solar sea glass Mason jar epiphany. Making the sea glass jar is super easy, and it only takes a few hours. Things You'll Need Sea glass (real or faux) Mason jar E-6000 Industrial Strength Glue White paint for lid Solar light   Step One Gather sea glass shards. I chose mostly sea foam, a few white, a few cobalt blue, and a some lime green. You can make a design too. I decided on a flower. The…
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Find Sea Glass in Lahaina, Hawaii

Find Sea Glass in Lahaina, Hawaii

Find Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
There are many places in Maui where you can find sea glass, especially if you walk along the shore at low tide where small pebbles lie on the beach. I've read in forums and in comment sections on blogs that people have found nice sea glass shards in Lahaina in front of Cheeseburger in Paradise restaurant in Maui; however, much of the sea glass has disappeared. Find Sea Glass in Kahana, Maui One place where you'll be sure to find some sea glass is a small cove off Lower Honoapiilani Road at the end of Pohaku Park. Pohaku Park is also referred to as S-Turns because of curve that used to be there until it was straightened.   Go During Low Tide One caveat: Be sure to go an hour before or…
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Sea Glass Pottery

Sea Glass Pottery

Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Pottery
Sea glass pottery or ceramics comes from earthenware, bricks, stoneware, tile, and porcelain, says Richard LaMotte author of the popular book Pure Sea Glass: Nature's Vanishing Gems. Although most sea glass pottery is found in the northeast of the United States, pottery dates back thousands of years, and many sea glass pottery shards can be hundreds of years old or even older. Sea glass pottery can be dated and identified by a ceramic expert if the color is unique or the pattern is distinct. Earthenware Pottery Earthen ware consists of clay and is heated until it's hard and firm. Nearly all ancient medieval, Middle Eastern, and European ceramics were earthenware, says LaMotte. Earthenware dates back to 10,000 BC Japan and is considered the first people-man art forms.   Stoneware Pottery…
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Sea Glass in Davenport, California

Sea Glass in Davenport, California

Find Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Davenport, California is located approximately 10 miles north of Santa Cruz. It's a small, secluded beach town on California's coast. While there have been reports of people finding beautiful, multicolored sea glass shards, recently finding sea glass on Davenport Beach has been more difficult. Some of the locals say that people bring shovels at low tide to dig for sea glass because the sea glass is not as abundant anymore. Sea Glass is Disappearing On Davenport Beach Besides the collecting of sea glass, the main reason sea glass has been disappearing is less glass has been dumped into the Vicente Creek that flows from the mountains to the ocean. Mystery of Colorful Sea Glass Near Vicente Creek on the Beach in Davenport, California After a heavy rainstorm in the 1970s, the…
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Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass

Orange Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
If you've found orange sea glass, you're quite lucky. The odds of finding orange are about 1 in 10,000, says Richard Lamotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature's Vanishing Gems. Why is Orange Sea Glass So Rare? The main reason orange sea glass is so rare is the color was not manufactured as much as other colored glass. In addition, back in the early 1900s, there was little evidence left behind that documented how orange glass was made, but it's likely little orange glass was produced because the chances of creating the same exact orange hue with chemicals in different batches of glass was challenging. Where Does Orange Sea Glass Come From? Glass manufacturers such as Jeanette, Federal, Fire-King, and Imperial made translucent orange tableware in the early 1900s.…
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Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Common and Rare Sea Glass Colors

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Because the color of sea glass is determined mostly by its source, on average, most sea glass shards people find lying on the shore come in the three most popular glass colors: green, clear white, and brown. Others colors, however, like orange, red, yellow, purple, and turquoise and even black are rare. Most sea glass come from bottles. A smaller percentage depending on color come from tableware, specialty glass, vases, stained glass, windows, car lights, marbles, insulators, and other forms of glass. Depending on where you collect sea glass, some colors might be rarer than others. For example, if you look for sea glass along the coasts of the United States, you'll likely find fewer rare cobalt blue, sea foam, orange or red shards than if you lived in another…
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Sea Glass Marbles

Sea Glass Marbles

Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog, Sea Glass Marbles
Children--and some adults too--have enjoyed playing with marbles for thousands of years. According to Richard LaMotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Discovering Nature"s Vanishing Gems, marbles have been found with the remains of Egyptian children. In the United States, clay marbles were mass produced in the 1880s: however, the popularity of marbles decreased in the latter half of the 20th century. Today antique marble collecting is popular. There is even an organization named Marble Collectors Society of America.  The site has a lot of pictures and information about the history of marbles. Find Sea Glass Marbles Sea glass marbles are rare. I haven't found one yet, but I did see a woman find a pretty blue one on Glass Beach in Fort Bragg, California. She let me look at it…
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Everything You Need to Know About Sea Glass Beads

Everything You Need to Know About Sea Glass Beads

Sea Glass Beads, Sea Glass Blog
Most people who look for sea glass beads usually buy faux sea glass beads in soft pastel colors. The Difference Between Real and Faux Sea Glass Beads Small authentic surf-tumbled and rounded sea glass beads like those that come from buttons, marbles, ornaments, and lights are extremely rare. Moreover, they're usually frosty not all perfectly symmetrical. Most collectors tend to keep the sea glass beads they find. The desire to use real surf-tumbled genuine sea glass beads may not realistic unless you buy them online from somewhere like ebay or Etsy. If you can find a reputable seller who offers authentic sea glass beads for sale, chances are good those beautiful, small drilled shards will be expensive.   Real Sea Glass Beads How to Drill Sea Glass Beads Another option is…
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Elegant and Rare Pink Sea Glass

Elegant and Rare Pink Sea Glass

Find Sea Glass, Pink Sea Glass, Rare Sea Glass, Sea Glass Blog
Most rare pink sea glass comes from transparent pattern-molded Depression glass tableware produced during the 1920s to the 1950s. The majority of its production was during the 1930s when the demand for affordable glassware rose during the Depression. Patterns and Colors Depression glass was produced in many assorted patterns and colors. Besides pink, most Depression glassware also came in other transparent colors such as yellow, green, light blue, and clear and translucent pastel blue and green. If you're interested in looking at the many different patterns of Depression glass, check out depression-glass.net. Finding Pink Sea Glass The odds of finding pink sea glass are rare: approximately 1 in 1,000, says Richard LaMotte author of Pure Sea Glass: Nature's Vanishing Gems. So far, I've only found two frosty pink shards in…
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Sea Glass Beaches in Southern California

Sea Glass Beaches in Southern California

Find Sea Glass, Sea Glass Beaches in Southern California, Sea Glass Blog
Even though many sea glass hunters rave of their finds on northern California beaches, there are beaches in southern California where you can also find sea glass.   Redondo Beach My favorite beach near my home to collect sea glass is located in the most southern part of Redondo Beach and Torrance Beach.  An hour before low tide, I begin my journey at the end of the bike path and head south along the water's edge towards Palos Verdes. Redondo Beach is a fickle beach for finding sea glass. Chances are good I'll find at least two or three nice shards, but some days, I don't find any sea glass. On a few occasions, the sea glass gods have blessed me with 10 to 20 shards. The best time to find…
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